What was your first camera?

I was asked recently about the first camera I owned and it made me think about the journey to where I am today.

Here are the cameras I have owned/operated over the last 30 years or so. Enjoy!

Kellog’s 110 film keychain camera maybe 6 box tops. 1987?

Kodak single use 35mm cameras – 90’s

Nikon FM SLR 35mm film camera with 50mm lens – 95-96

Canon 35mm film water proof Sure Shot camera – 96 on (purchase with Marlboro miles!)

Pentax ZX-50 SLR 35mm film camera – 96-07 This was the camera I used throughout college and on.

Nikon Coolpix p7000 digital camera – 04-on  First digital camera, but I had no clue on how to store, process, etc.

Canon Rebel digital camera – 06  First used DSLR, still no clue how to process, organize, etc. and derailed shutter within the first few months in my procession!

Canon 20d dslr – 07-12  This camera also marked the time when I bought Michael Clark’s “A Professional Photographer’s Workflow” ebook. Or as I call it, “The Bible of digital photography management.” Do yourself a favor and buy this book.

Canon 5d mark ii – 12-14

Canon 5d Mark iii – 14-16

Sony A7Rii – 16- on. First mirrorless.

Sony A9 – 17 – on

The road to Tensleep, Wyoming

Carissa Gold Mine, South Pass City, Wyoming.
Carissa Gold Mine, South Pass City, Wyoming.

I had been sitting on my hands for most of the summer. With a large sailing trip planned for September I convinced myself to lay low for the months of June and July. By the time August rolled around I could sit still no longer. I reached out and invited myself along for a few climbing trips. One to Saddleback Peak(Elephants Perch) and the other to Tensleep, Wyoming.

Shiho Kobayashi at the Carissa Mine, South Pass City, Wyoming.
Shiho Kobayashi at the Carissa Mine, South Pass City, Wyoming.

As the dates grew closer for the Tensleep trip the forecast took a turn. A few people backed out, but others, having taken time off from work were committed. As for me, my schedule was clear because it was a week before the trip to Europe and besides I was excited for time away from the desk and nights of sleeping on the ground. The morning we left the Salt Lake Valley it was raining heavily. Into Wyoming on I-80 we managed to pull out in front of the storm. Knowing it would eventually catch up to us we decided to take it slow and made a couple of stops along the way.

Dave, the barkeep, at the Atlantic City Mercantile.
Dave, the barkeep, at the Atlantic City Mercantile.
Phonograph, Atlantic City Mercantile.
Phonograph, Atlantic City Mercantile.
Cash register at the Atlantic City Mercantile.
Cash register at the Atlantic City Mercantile.

Just west of Lander, Wyoming are the small mining villages of South Pass and Atlantic City. I’d driven to Lander, Cody and the Wind Rivers before and each time had ignored these signs. My impression was that it would be a tourist trap. This time driving to Tensleep, knowing a rainy camp was the only thing we had to look forward, I figured, “Why not?”

The Carissa gold Mine of South Pass City was our first stop. Mining in the South Pass erupted in the 1860’s. The Carissa Mine operated into the 1950’s. At the turn of the 21st Century the State of Wyoming purchased the mine and reconstructed it for the public to see. During the summer months they offer tours. Turning off the main highway we rolled down the improved road until this mine interrupted the horizon of the high plains.

Scrabble at out rainy camp in Tensleep Canyon.
Scrabble at our rainy camp in Tensleep Canyon.
Pancake breakfast in Tensleep Canyon.
Pancake breakfast in Tensleep Canyon.

After Carissa we made the short drive to small collection of old cabins and eclectic homes in Atlantic City, where the city sign read, “Population about 54.” We stopped at the Atlantic City Mercantile for sarsaparillas. This bar and grill is filled with antiques and memorabilia and was brought back to the public’s attention by Robert Redford and National Geographic. Built in the late 1800’s it was shuttered in the first half of the 20th Century then reopened in the 1960’s with its original name and look. Dave, the barkeep for the last twelve years, informed us they were fresh out of sarsaparilla so we had to settle for barley pops instead. Yes, it felt like I was tourist, but man it was till cool to stop and check out the history.

Camp fire at Tensleep Canyon camp.
Camp fire at Tensleep Canyon camp.
Sleeping in the mud in Tensleep Canyon.
Sleeping in the mud in Tensleep Canyon.

We did eventually make to Tensleep Canyon and did wait out the rain for another day before actually climbing. I stayed away from the desk, slept in the mud and did get a little climbing in to boot.

Paul on Happiness in Slavery, Tensleep Canyon.
Paul on Happiness in Slavery, Tensleep Canyon.
Shiho on Number One Enemy, Tensleep Canyon.
Shiho on Number One Enemy, Tensleep Canyon.

Gone but not forgotten.

Visited family in the Uintah Basin for the holiday. I was surprised by the wave of emotions. Here’s a excerpt from my journal.

July 5th, 2014

Sunrise over Strawberry Canyon, Utah.
Sunrise over Strawberry Canyon, Utah.

 

The burnt aroma of sage mixed with the musky-sweet of the cottonwoods fills my chest. The summer’s morning light casts fading shadows along cliffs of gray sandstone. Fields of sweet grass and alfalfa wink droplets of dew. Irrigating sprinklers tisk in rotation. Stands of tamarisk shield the meandering path of the stream. I bend and touch the warming earth, letting the breath escape my lungs. “Hello Earth.” A tiger stripped mosquito flaps its wings near my ear. “Hello family.” There is no wind to cut the coming heat. Memories pulse through my battered soul… the sticky affection of family and the longing to feel her love. Above clouds spread thin and useless against a pale sky. I press my hand firmly to the ground searching for a pulse.

Strawberry Canyon, Utah.
Strawberry Canyon, Utah.

“Hello Mother… I’ve missed you.”