Fat Tires in the Land of Enchantment

Monsoon season arrives. Macky Franklin races the rain on the trails of Northside at Taos Ski Valley, New Mexico.

Two days of mountain biking in the mountains of northern New Mexico.

Fat Tires in the Land of Enchantment

July 2019 saw me teaming up with fat tire power duo Syd and Macky for the second time. Our first collaboration had taken place in the Wasatch near my home, this time we met up on Macky’s home turf, Taos, New Mexico.

Monsoon season arrives. Macky Franklin and Syd Schulz take in the view from Frazer Mountain, 12,163′, the highest point at Northside at Taos Ski Valley, New Mexico.

Ingredients for this project:
Four products
Two days
Two locations in mountains/forest
Miles and miles of single-track trails
A plethora of scenic views
Decent weather
Two psyched and capable riders
And one person with a camera who hopefully can keep up

Place all items in brown bag then shake until completely saturated. Enjoy!

Gear explosion at the Northside at Taos Ski Valley trailhead, New Mexico.

Osprey Packs had asked for new imagery of the Siskin/Salida and Savu/Seral packs in action. We considered a few locations before agreeing on the Sangre de Cristo Range of northern New Mexico. Then in the weeks leading up to the dates wild fires broke out and rapidly spread. In response the Forest Service closed most public trailheads.  Luckily Syd and Macky have friends in high places and they called in a favor to two. One to the land owner of Northside at Taos Ski Valley, Roger Patterson, and another to Kailah Tucker at Angel Fire Resort.

Monsoon season arrives. Macky Franklin and Syd Schulz riding the trails at Northside at Taos Ski Valley, New Mexico.
Monsoon season arrives. Macky Franklin riding the trails at Northside at Taos Ski Valley, New Mexico.
Monsoon season arrives. Macky Franklin and Syd Schulz race the rain on the trails of Northside at Taos Ski Valley, New Mexico.

On day one we shot the Salida/Siskin packs at Northside at Taos Ski Valley. Having only visited Taos in the winter I was excited to soak it up during the warmer season. Single track climbing above 12,000 feet, moody skies, constant laughter, and views for days without another soul in sight. This was a treat. We raced the weather shooting for several hours before making it back to the van just as the skies opened up. Soaking wet we met up with Roger at Tim’s Stray Dog Cantina. Brisket tacos, yum!

Monsoon season arrives. Macky Franklin and Syd Schulz take five on the summit of Frazer Mountain, Northside at Taos Ski Valley, New Mexico.
Monsoon season arrives. Macky Franklin and Syd Schulz make it back to the van just as the skies open up, Northside at Taos Ski Valley, New Mexico.

 

 

Day two arrived with cloudy skies hanging over Angel Fire Resort. We switched the focus to the Savuand Seralhip/lumbar packs rode the lift. The rumors are true. There’s a reason Angel Fire has been voted best in the southwest for five years in a row. 2000 vertical feet, 60-plus miles of well engineered trails. Flow, super chunk, and jump lines led to fast and fun times ending with a little sprint session on the town trails, but not before mowing down a huge taco salad at El Jefe.

The sound of silence. Syd Schulz and Macky Franklin find solitude on the trails of Angel Fire Resort, New Mexico.
Macky Franklin rolling the trails at Angel Fire, New Mexico.
Couples who play together stay together. Macky Franklin and Syd Schulz rolling the trails at Angel Fire, New Mexico.

 

The two fun filled days flew by were the conversation wandered easily from wedding plans, training, travel, making ends meet, and a whole lot of bike talk. Thanks Syd and Macky for the solid good times.

Under/Over. Syd Schulz and Macky Franklin having fun at Angel Fire Resort, New Mexico.
The Green Belt Trails of Angel Fire with Syd Schulz and Macky Franklin, New Mexico.

Have any summer plans? Drop me a line.

Cheers,

Louis

 

The Easy Shots

The Crown-of-the-head shot. Might be okay, but I really want to see who this is.
Easy shot. The Crown-of-the-head shot. Might be okay, but I really want you to see who this is.

A few months ago I had a great conversation with a friend of mine who happened to be a photo editor. I was looking for feedback and he was willing to help. One nugget of wisdom he gave regarding climbing photography was not to shoot the easy stuff. It was something about not sending him images from Indian Creek. He said, “People shoot it because it’s easy,” or close to that. I believe the editor was implying that he sees tons of shots from the Creek and that if an image of a single pitch route from the area had a chance at being used it had better stand out otherwise it would be swimming is a sea of similar photos.

Two guidelines ignored. Shot from the anchors of the route and this thing has been photographed more than enough, but I still shot it.
Easy shot with two guidelines ignored. Shot from the anchors of the route and this thing has been photographed more than enough, but I still shot it and dig it. Swimming in the sea.

This is kind of a subjective. I have peers who believe fixing a line and jugging it at any crag is too much work. Whether it’s up the talus cone in the Creek or at your local roadside crag they would consider it more effort than it’s worth. I take the stance that it doesn’t take too much energy to set up a fixed line for single pitch routes, but do believe if you don’t practice shooting “easy” climbing shots now you’ll be unprepared when you go out to get the harder ones.

Easy shot taken from the ground. Wish the climber were wearing brighter clothes.
Easier shot taken from the ground. Wish the climber were wearing brighter clothes and we could see their profile.

 

Easy shot from the bolts of adjacent route. Love the shot, wish he had a bright shirt on...
Easy shot from the bolts of adjacent route. Love the shot though it might be better if he had a bright shirt on…

The first images I took from a fixed rope didn’t turn out. In fact they are totally forgettable. In the beginning I was so excited to be shooting from above and so focused on the mechanics of ascending and descending that I let composition and peak action fly out the window. I quickly realized that if I were going to be any good at this I would have to put some thought into it.

Easy shot from the top of a route way off to the side.
Easy shot from the top of a route way off to the side. This is not the Creek.
Easy shot from the route adjacent to.
Easy shot from the route adjacent to.

I started by asking questions before I left the ground. Has this route been photographed before? (As a rule I try not to shoot routes that I have seen photos of, but make exceptions from time to time.)  Are there interesting angles to shoot from the ground? Does the route favor one side of the climber or the other? How’s the light? Where’s it coming from? How’s the background? Will it be distracting or will it add something? What color is the rock in relation to the climber? Will they stand out enough? The next lesson learned was that shooting from a line fixed to the anchors of the route you are shooting doesn’t (most of the time) really work. There’s a lot of talk about the dreaded butt shoot, but have you heard about the crown-of-the-head shot? There’s nothing more disappointing after you have set up your line and jugged repeatedly to only come home with countless images of faceless climbers. Yes, one of these shots might be interesting, but a whole day of shooting these will bum you out. Getting to the side, clipping a bolt, placing gear and using the anchors of the route next to it or even further seem to do the trick.

Not as easy single pitch from tree off to the side.
Not as easy single pitch from tree off to the side.
Harder shot. Easier with someone rope gunning for me. 300 feet of the deck.
Harder shot. Easier with someone rope gunning for me. 300 feet of the deck.

Practice, practice, practice on the easy shots translated well when the shots became harder. I recall shooting a route in Death Canyon. Our party of three climbed up five or six pitches before I set up my line. As I weighted the equalized anchor of cams and lowered out over a 1000 feet of air I was happy to have spent so much time shooting the “easy” stuff. It may not be the best shot, but I am certain I have never seen this image before…

What do you think the difference between an easy and hard image is?

Hard shot? I think it qualifies. Five or six pitches of climbing with camera and rigging equipment, leading through and building a belay, lowering, then jugging and shooting… Never been used.
Hard shot? I think it qualifies. Five or six pitches of climbing with camera and rigging equipment, leading through and building a belay, lowering, then jugging and shooting… It’s never been used.

 

Discovering jems in your own back yard. What new areas have you recently discovered?

This article appeared in the Summer 2013 issue of Utah Adventure Journal.

 

Sunset in front of Cobb Peak.
Sunset in front of Cobb Peak.

After saying good night to my wife and twelve-year-old stepdaughter, and while breathing in the lupine scented air I sensed something new and musky. Unzipping the tent I peered out from the edge of a large alpine cirque to see the sliver of a crescent moon low on the twilit horizon. On a whim to get away and explore someplace new, beautiful and hopefully not too crowded, we chose to backpack into the southwestern corner of the Pioneer Mountains near Sun Valley, Idaho. It was late July and we had just settled down for the night in Hyndman Basin. Above us, in the purple hue of sky, stars winked alive while my eyes adjusted to the light. Soon the silhouettes of half a dozen elk materialized in the gloaming. Near a babbling brook they fed on grasses and flowers before passing through camp, so close I could hear their breathing.

Checking in with Joe Miczulski at the Ketchum Ranger District Office of the Sawtooth National Forest, he agreed that the Pioneer’s, or Pio’s, don’t see as much human traffic as the surrounding ranges. This makes sharing ventures in the region with wildlife that includes black bear, elk, deer, mountain goats, mountains lions, coyotes and wolves, more common. “Even at the peak of summer use it seems you can always find solitude up near Hyndman,.. even more so if you spend the night.” He explained.

Sun Valley Trekking co-owner and Wood River Valley resident for nearly 13 years, Francie St. Onge, echoed Joe’s claim of less traffic and more wildlife. She also recommended it as a place to bring the kids. Francie has been bringing her four-year-old daughter, Neve, to Hyndman Basin since she was an infant. “It’s a great place to bring the kids with several options depending on their ability.” She recommended, for smaller children, making the journey to Outfitter Meadow, which sits at the western foot of Cobb Peak between Big and Hyndman Basin. At 9,000 feet the meadow contains a pond, pine trees, has a small creek running through it and is filled with areas for kids to play and families to camp.

Older kids can make it another mile and 1,000 feet into Hyndman Basin proper. There they can wander through gnarled firs or run through spring fed meadows that overflow with wildflowers. Paintbrush, sunflowers, elephant head, blue camas are only a few of the flowers they can identify. If the kids are up for additional elevation gain and more adventure make your way to the saddle between Old Hyndman and Hyndman Peak and follow the second-class trail to Idaho’s ninth highest point at 12,009 feet. From the summit of Hyndman Peak they will be rewarded with a 360-degree panorama that includes the highest point in the state, Mt. Borah.

An alternative to going into Hyndman Basin is the historic Pioneer Cabin. Parents with older children can easily make it a day hike. Built in the 1930’s by Sun Valley ski instructors this pine cabin, located on the western edge of the Pio’s, is open to the public and may be used on a first come first serve basis. The simple structure, donning an aluminum roof, single pane windows and containing a wood-burning stove offers stupendous views of not only the Pio’s, but the surrounding ranges as well. You may reach the cabin via Corral Creek, Johnstone Creek or Hyndman Creek. These can be out-and -back, through-hikes, or loops.

We chose the basin. Leaving the Hyndman Creek Trailhead that morning the three of us crossed a footbridge heading east. Following a gently graded, abandoned mining road we wandered through fields of grass peppered with firecracker penstemons, sego lilies and dancing aspens. For three reasonable miles, that eased Josie, my stepdaughter, into the hike, we passed and were passed by a few others before the trail steepened. Here it quickly climbed 600 feet depositing us in a meadow filled with the blooming lupine. Strolling by the vacant Pioneer Yurt, which is operated by Sun Valley Trekking during only the winter months, we found a comfortable spot beside the creek. Taking shelter from the sun beneath the trees we discovered vibrant columbine flowers. Refreshed by the passing water and cool breeze we lunched and discussed camping in the meadow. Unanimously we chose to make the final push into the basin. There we found a secluded site for our camp, set up and immediately ventured to the frosty waters of a small alpine lake. As we waded and skipped stones, a string of hikers meandered by, emptying the basin as the hour grew later. It was here that we encountered our only neighbors for the night; a group of five who had come to summit Hyndman.

Elephanthead wildflowers in Hyndman Basin, Pioneer Mountains, Idaho.
Elephanthead wildflowers in Hyndman Basin, Pioneer Mountains, Idaho.

In contrast to their neighboring ranges of Boulder, Smokey and Sawtooth Mountains, the Pioneers tower above not only in elevation, but also in their geological variety. According to geologist Darlene Batatian, who did her graduate work mapping the range, the creation of the Pioneers left visible layers of gneiss, quartzite, schist and other rocks for those who experience the area. The edge of Hyndman Basin, hanging above the canyons below on the rising side of a detachment fault, is an example of a Mylionitic zone, the place where the shearing force of the land either pulverized the rock into tiny crystals or morphed its structure into something else; the result being an array of color in the land that is both amazing and breathtaking.

Back at camp we spread a geology map in a field of wildflowers. Doing my best to find our location then identify different rock types, the sun dropped lower in a royal blue sky. The deepening hues were a rainbow of earth tones in the setting sun. As I read each description Josie pointed to the areas that seemed to match. The main peaks of Cobb, Old Hyndman and Hyndman, serrated and jagged, appeared to be gneiss, grey, featured and beautiful. Tilting rapidly off the southwestern slopes of Cobb and Duncan Ridge was a softer layer of yellow dolomite, eroding its way down into the canyons below. Casting our gaze West, toward Bald Mountain, we saw layers of orange tinted quartzite glinting off the lesser peaks and points before being swallowed by the greens of sage, pines and aspens that blanketed the land below.

That evening, after the elk had moved on, I fell into a deep slumber only to wake in the wee hours of the night. I crawled from the warmth of my bag and tent and stood still as the breeze caused goose bumps to rise from my arms. Above our tent ran the span of the Milkyway, streaking south from the summit of Hyndman across a star filled sky. It seemed to touch down in the Snake River Basin. I heard the wind whirling around the peaks, the stream passing by and the breathing of my wife and daughter, deep in slumber. I had one thought in my head before returning to bed, “We should always go on a whim.”

Milkyway above Easton Rimrock 2P tent, Hyndman Basin, Pioneer Mountains, Idaho.

 

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Guide Book: Hiking Idaho  Ralph Maughan and Jackie Johnson Maughan  A Falcon Guide

Maps:  Hyndman Peak USGS quadrangle

For current conditions and restrictions Sawtooth National Forest Ketchum Ranger District  208-622-0090

Sun Valley Trekking:  208-788-1966  www.svtrek.com

Outdoor stores:

Elephants Perch  208-726-3497

Sturtevants  425-454-6465

Backwoods Mountain Sports  208-726-8818

When to visit:

Visit midsummer for the height of flowers season, bring bug repellant to ward off mosquitoes and deer flies, and then return in autumn when the aspens leaves have changed from their usual green to a vibrant tangerine.

Getting to the trailhead:

Turn off Highway 75  5.5 miles north of Hailey. Drive 6 miles East. Take a hard left at sign that reads North Fork of Hyndman Creek. Drive 3 miles to the crossing of Johnstone Creek. Cross Johnstone Creek and continue another 1.5 miles to the parking area.

GPS

Hyndman Peak = Latitude: 43-44’57” N Longitude: 114-07’51” W

Pioneer Cabin = Latitude: 43-44’35” N Longitude: 114-11’29” W

Old Hyndman Peak = Latitude: 43-44’27” N Longitude: 114-07’01” W

Cobb Peak = Latitude: 43-43’52” N Longitude: 114-07’35” W

Duncan Ridge = Latitude: 43-45’03” N Longitude: 114-08’43” W

Big Basin = Latitude: 43-43’33” N Longitude: 114-07’09” W

 

Trimbleoutdoors.com

http://www.trimbleoutdoors.com/ViewTrip/1319173